BlogHangout

Building effective communities, online and offline

June 22, 2014 — by Jason Schemmel0

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BlogHangout

Building effective communities, online and offline

June 22, 2014 — by Jason Schemmel0

Building effective communities, online and offlineYou have a passion, you created a community about this passion and invited others who this passion to join in for fun, productive engagement among the group. After a while, you begin to think there’s something more this group needs or could do, but you’re not sure what. Who better to ask for feedback than those already in the group? The question is, what’s the best way to go about asking and receiving that feedback?

#CMGRHangout recently discussed building offline communities. Panelists Tony Bacigalupo, Liana Kreamer, Anthony Marinos, and Meghan Murphy shared their experiences and insights about what it’s like to start, maintain, and grow a community. One of the topics discussed was how to ask for feedback.

Finding effective community feedback

Some of the more common ways to find effective feedback include Members Only events/Happy Hours for offline communities and surveys/forums for online communities. In-person events allow people to connect and talk informally, leaving things open for discussions and constructive feedback. Oftentimes, these turn into impromptu brainstorming sessions and new ideas are created. Members Only events are effective in the way that you’re bringing people together who are actively invested (not just interested) in the community.

Surveys and forums are also effective ways to receive people’s thoughts and opinions. Asking specific or open-ended questions can give you the feedback you are looking for on how to better a process, increase productivity, get more people engaged/talking within the community, and build better relationships. Whatever you do, make sure that you acknowledge the people who leave feedback. Make it known that their opinions matter and that you will be considering what they say. In doing this, you are increasing your odds of more feedback from those people in the future.

Applying community feedback

An important aspect to remember is that it’s not just gaining that feedback from others, but also what you DO with it. You can ask for people’s opinions all you want, but if nothing is done about it, then it was waste of time to begin with. People will begin to notice that leaving feedback won’t change anything and one of two things will happen:

  1. They will stop providing feedback, meaning you could miss out on some great ideas;
  2. They will feel unappreciated and leave the community (which is worse because if anyone asks them how they feel about your community, odds are you not get a favorable recommendation).

Implementation is just as important as receiving the information.

So what about you? What other ways do you go about receiving feedback? When was a time you received feedback and implemented it?

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Jason Schemmel

Owner/CEO at ENTRPRSR, LLC
Owner of ENTRPRSR. Into Social Media & Psychology. Entrepreneur, love to meet & assist others. Not afraid to admit I'm goofy & a dork. Hockey fanatic. All for paying it forward.
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